Optimal Pass the Pigs Strategy (Part One)

Since I'm out of town for a bit, I'm migrating over a few relevant posts from an old blog of mine that I'm planning to shut down. Enjoy!

Pass the Pigs is a simple yet addictive dice game that uses cute little plastic pigs as dice. If you've never played, the rules are very straightforward. On each turn, a player rolls two pigs. The pigs will land in different positions, which will determine how many points the player has in their hand for that turn. The player may then decide to "pass the pigs" to the next player. If they do this, all of the points in their hand will be added to their official score. They may also decide to roll the pigs again to try to add more points to their hand before passing the pigs. But they must be careful! If the pigs both land on their sides with one showing a dot and the other showing a blank side, they "pig out" and lose all of the points they've accumulated in their hand! It's risky business. The first player to accumulate a score of 100 or higher wins.

Pass the Pigs

Credit: Larry Moore

Like anything with dice (even pig-shaped dice), Pass the Pigs is a game of chance. That means, with a little effort, we should be able to figure out the probabilities of certain things happening in the game, and develop some optimal strategies. So how do you win at Pass the Pigs? Read on to find out.

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Distance between Latitude and Longitude Coordinates in SQL

Pretty much any language commonly used for data analysis (R, SAS, Python) can calculate the distance between two geographic coordinates with relative ease. But always having to pull your data out of your data warehouse any time you want to do some basic geographic analysis can be frustrating - sometimes it's nice to keep simple queries all in one system. If you've got a spatially enabled version of Postgres or SQL Server, you're in business. But if not, you'll need to roll your own SQL solution.

Great Circles

Because the earth is a sphere, the quickest route between two points is a "Great Circle," which may appear curved on flat maps...

In today's post, we're going to write our own code in vanilla SQL to calculate the distance between two latitude and longitude coordinates.

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