Send Google Analytics Data to Your Own Server

In last week’s post, we explored how to tag individual users and hits with unique identifiers in Google Analytics, so that an analyst could export raw data from the Google Analytics API for complex statistical analyses not possible in the GA interface. But there are undoubtedly some situations in which even that solution isn’t good enough – Google limits the number of metrics and dimensions you can download in a single query, for example. What do you do then?

Luckily, there’s a solution for this. We’ll just send Google Analytics data on a little detour from the user’s browser to our own web server, process it ourselves, and query to our hearts content!

The 1945 movie, Detour, starring Tom Neal and Ann Savage.

The methodology I’ll summarize today allows an organization to leverage much of the value-add of Google Analytics (for instance, they’ve already done all the hard work of detecting JavaScript, flash, screen size, page, URL, etc.) while still processing the data on their own servers. It’s a massive win-win.

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Export Raw Data from Google Analytics (the Free Way)

Today, we’re going to use a couple of lines of JavaScript code to get free access to raw data from Google Analytics. That’s a feature that’s usually only available in Google Analytics Premium, a product which will set you back a cool $150,000 a year.

In this how-to video, the author merges customer data with Google Analytics data via Google BigQuery. Luckily, you can unlock these kinds of features without having to take out a second mortgage.

Think that sounds like a cool idea? Let’s get started.

Quick update… would you be interested in a service that let you add a couple lines of JavaScript to your site and then get all your raw Google Analytics data from an API? I’m thinking of putting that together and I’d love to talk to you about it. Let me know your interest here: https://goo.gl/forms/FtGL8e0ejBUmQO1q1.

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Probabilities in Google Analytics Content Experiments

Have you ever taken a look at the “probability of outperforming” metric in Google Analytics’ Content Experiments and wondered how it was calculated? Have you ever scratched your head because the numbers didn’t make sense to you? I certainly have. It’s hard to see experiment results like the ones depicted below and not wonder what’s going on underneath the hood.

GA Experiment Data

Real data from a GA content experiment, showing an under-performing variant with a >50% chance of outperforming the original. It’s like trash-talking when you’re down at the half.

In this post, we’ll highlight how Google’s Content Experiments work, why it’s a really smart idea, and why you might still want to do a little bit of the heavy lifting yourself…

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Are Your Affiliate Partners Cannibalizing Organic Sales?

What if your business was paying a bunch of extra money to bring in sales that would have happened anyway?

In the e-commerce business, affiliate marketing promises to deliver increased sales by getting your name and products showing up on dozens of sites, blogs, and social media pages. Of course, this sounds like a great boon – more traffic, more sales, more profits. But, in many cases, the results aren’t nearly as good as you might expect. If you’re not careful, your affiliate program can cannibalize sales that were going to happen anyway…

Cutco knives seem like the 1990's equivalent of affiliate marketing...Image Credit: Hustvedt  [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], on Wikimedia Commons)

Cutco knives – affiliate marketing’s evil twin brother.
(Image Credit: Hustvedt [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], on Wikimedia Commons)

In today’s post, I’ll show you a simple technique to figure out how cannibalistic your affiliate program is, using a specially-designed Google Analytics segment.

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