Send Google Analytics Data to Your Own Server

In last week’s post, we explored how to tag individual users and hits with unique identifiers in Google Analytics, so that an analyst could export raw data from the Google Analytics API for complex statistical analyses not possible in the GA interface. But there are undoubtedly some situations in which even that solution isn’t good enough – Google limits the number of metrics and dimensions you can download in a single query, for example. What do you do then?

Luckily, there’s a solution for this. We’ll just send Google Analytics data on a little detour from the user’s browser to our own web server, process it ourselves, and query to our hearts content!

The 1945 movie, Detour, starring Tom Neal and Ann Savage.

The methodology I’ll summarize today allows an organization to leverage much of the value-add of Google Analytics (for instance, they’ve already done all the hard work of detecting JavaScript, flash, screen size, page, URL, etc.) while still processing the data on their own servers. It’s a massive win-win.

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Export Raw Data from Google Analytics (the Free Way)

Today, we’re going to use a couple of lines of JavaScript code to get free access to raw data from Google Analytics. That’s a feature that’s usually only available in Google Analytics Premium, a product which will set you back a cool $150,000 a year.

In this how-to video, the author merges customer data with Google Analytics data via Google BigQuery. Luckily, you can unlock these kinds of features without having to take out a second mortgage.

Think that sounds like a cool idea? Let’s get started.

Quick update… would you be interested in a service that let you add a couple lines of JavaScript to your site and then get all your raw Google Analytics data from an API? I’m thinking of putting that together and I’d love to talk to you about it. Let me know your interest here: https://goo.gl/forms/FtGL8e0ejBUmQO1q1.

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Random Forest Classifiers as a Web Service in PHP

Recently, I found myself wanting to be able to make real-time, online predictions using a random forest classifier trained in R. Of course, there are many ways to make that happen – I could have used yhat’s ScienceOps product, for example. But, for project-specific reasons, I decided that the best route to go in this case was to get my hands dirty and build my own RESTful API for making predictions using my model.

Apparently, back in 2011, Disney debuted a show called "So Random." Thankfully, it only ran for a single season...

Apparently, back in 2011, Disney debuted a show called “So Random.” Thankfully, it only ran for a single season…

In this post, we’ll walk through all of the code necessary to export a random forest classifier from R and use it to make real-time online predictions in a PHP script.

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Map Addresses for Free with the Census Geocoding API

Looking for a free geocoding solution and frustrated by the lack of options?

Though it’s poorly publicized (and documented), the US Census Bureau maintains a RESTful API for real-time and batch geocoding that’s free, fast, and accurate. It doesn’t even require an API key. Essentially, it’s everything you’d get out of a roll-your-own PostGIS Census/TIGER solution, without the hassle of having to set it up.

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Buildings are related to Geocoding, right?
Image Credit: Diego Delso [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The only limitation is that the API mainly provides geocoding for residential addresses. Because the Census Bureau’s primary task is, well, conducting the national census, they’re a lot more interested in where people live than where they work. So, if you need to map business addresses, you may have to go elsewhere. But if you’re mapping customers (or students, or volunteers, or mailing list recipients, or whatever), the service is pretty on-point. In my work, I’ve seen about a 90% match rate for customer addresses when submitted to Census. Not too shabby.

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